Reflections on agriculture education

I have been working directly with students in public and private schools across North Iowa for the better part of 20 years. I am not, nor have I ever been, under contract with a particular school district. Yet I’ve seen tens of thousands of students in my tenure, always with the goal of promoting Iowa agriculture and stressing its importance to our economy and our communities.

rockwell-oct-2016North Central Iowa Ag in the Classroom is the organization I work for, and expectation number one on my job description is to seek out and develop interesting agriculture lessons. It is my job to gather the resources necessary to educate youth about agriculture, and to find ways to (hopefully!) hold the attention of my audience. It might be a 3 year-old preschooler or a middle school student whose mind can be a difficult thing to engage.

Today, there is vastly more support for those of us tasked with providing accurate agriculture education to students and adults. When I started my career in agriculture education, there were few organizations like the Iowa Agriculture Literacy Foundation that someone in my position could turn to for help. There was no such thing as a one-stop source for book recommendations, lesson plans and activities in one neat bundle. It wasn’t uncommon for me to spend days researching and refining a single lesson. I might come across a book I thought described an interesting chunk of Iowa agriculture or farming practices. If I wanted to use that book as the basis for classroom instruction, I then had to seek out or write the lesson plan to complete the message. Once I had the book and lesson plan, then it was on to finding or developing an activity to make the concept more meaningful to the students. Remember, this was pre-Pinterest time! I was completely on my own!

In the beginning, my colleagues and I were commonly considered to be “entertainment” for the students since it was unusual for agriculture to be accepted as an important, relevant component in elementary education.  And, I must admit, we submitted to that request for entertainment in order to get our foot in the door of many school districts. We built scarecrows during a fall harvest festival, we entered classrooms dressed up as the Nutrition Princess to talk about healthy food choices, and we hauled a microwave around to be prepared to make corn plastic.

Rather than building scarecrows, now we talk to kids about the environment and how concerned farmers are about protecting it. We don’t have to dress up in costumes to get students’ attention when we tell them that farmers in Iowa grow the corn and soybeans that become foods they eat every day. Or when we tell them how dedicated farmers are to caring for their livestock.

eville3-nov-2015

Happily, for me and everyone else involved in teaching the next generation of consumers where their food and fiber originates, what we do has become a much more respected practice in the eyes of teachers and administrators. They truly understand the value of teaching youth the importance of agriculture and the many careers tied to that industry.

cs3-oct-2015I am impressed with how far we’ve advanced agriculture education in schools. There are many organizations across the country coming together to support each other’s efforts to teach about farming, and that’s making it much easier for people like me.

-Brenda Mormann, North Central Iowa Ag in the Classroom

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